Usually during a sightseeing walk we visit most of the places during the day while sometimes, it is definitely interesting visiting them at night too. We’d like to do a compilation of quite known places in Spain that have some kind of special magic during the night… enjoy our top 10 best places in Spain under the moonlight:

1. Hanging Houses in Cuenca: These famous houses have a special mystery with the silence of the night and all the legends surrounding them. One of this legends tells the story of Catalina, mother of an undesired king’s son who was kidnapped in the middle of the night. They say you can still hear Catalina screaming for his son.

Hanging Houses at night in Cuenca

Hanging Houses at night in Cuenca

2. Alhambra in Granada: One of the most known landmarks of Spain located in Andalucia, the fortress built in the 9th century and drastically renovated in the 13th by a Moorish Emir. During the night it gets transformed under the lights and you can enjoy a much pleasant visit with less tourists than during daytime.

The Alhambra at night in Granada

The Alhambra at night in Granada

3. Concha Bay in San Sebastian: the jewel of the Basque Country looks splendid at night from the view point at the Igueldo Mountain. If you are lucky to be there during the city festivities in August, you can enjoy the International Fireworks Contest that takes places every year.

Concha Bay at night in San Sebastian

Concha Bay at night in San Sebastian

4. Old City of Toledo: Probably one of the best views of the city can be enjoyed from the Mirador del Valle, that can be reached by car from the city center. The Alcazar fortress and the Roman Catholic Cathedral look like in a postcard at night, a view difficult to forget.

Toledo at night form the Valle Viewpoint

Toledo at night form the Valle Viewpoint

5. Cordoba Mosque: One of the Islamic jewels of Spain with a unique architecture and the remains of great stories within its walls. Walking along the main courtyard feeling the magic in the air, it’s something every traveler should experience.

Cordoba Mosque at night

Cordoba Mosque at night

6. The Gran Via in Madrid: Most of the citizens of Madrid agree on something: the Gran Via looks much prettier during the night than in daytime. Probably one of the most famous streets in Spain and a very lively place even at midnight, ideal to be discovered walking or by bicycle.

The Gran Via at night in Madrid

The Gran Via at night in Madrid

7. Magic Fountain in Barcelona: Located in Montjuic, it’s one of those secrets that everyone knows in Barcelona and this time with no doubt, you must see it at night! You can find it between the MNAC and Plaza España and enjoy the music and light performance that takes place every half an hour.

The Magic Fountain at night in Barcelona

Magic Fountain at night in Barcelona

8. Triana bridge in Sevilla: Officially known as the Isabel II Bridge, it’s a fine example of 19th century architecture and one of the landmarks of the city. They say in Spain “Sevilla has a special color” and we can assure that color is even more special at night 😉

The Triana bridge at night in Sevilla

Triana bridge at night in Sevilla

9. Aqueduct of Segovia: One of the nicest pieces of architecture from the Roman Empire, built around the 1st century before Christ, 813 meters long and still remaining intact. Illuminated during the night looks even more impressive.

The aqueduct of Segovia at night

Aqueduct of Segovia at night

10. Roman Theatre of Merida: Part of the Unesco Human Heritage and located in one of the largest and most extensive archaeological sites in Spain. Looking at it in silence during the night, you can imagine the old Romans performing with grace.

The Roman Theatre at night in Merida

Roman Theatre at night in Merida

We hope you liked the list and don’t hesitate to contribute to it in the comments!

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Credit: Photos by Miguel Egido, Gustavo Alterio, Claudio Coccia, Salvador Garnes, Minube, Jesus M. Calvo, Francisco Rubio, Julio Fajardo, Jose Antonio Bejarano and Pere Olivares.

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